Christ as King and Judge

Word Alive–Fr. Bel San Luis, SVD November 21, 2021/FEAST OF CHRIST THE KING

Today is the feast of Christ the King of the Universe. Is Christ really a king? Standing before Pilate, Christ did not deny it. But then he said, “My kingdom does not belong to this world” (Jn 18,36).

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In his book titled, His Word Resounds, Albert Cylwicki says: “Christ’s kingdom does not depend on military might, economic strength or political power. It is a spiritual kingdom that depends on faith, prayer and good works. It is a kingdom that promotes peace where there is violence, justice where there is exploitation and freedom where there is oppression.”

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In this Sunday gospel, the figure that’s presented is a king who will judge us. He will decide on that final day who will or will not share his kingdom forever. It’s a dreadful scene but for those who are faithful to Jesus’ teachings, it will be a day of glory.

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If you read carefully the parable of the Last Judgment (Mt. 25, 31-46), you will notice that our judgment will not depend on whether you’re a genius, a Miss Universe, the wealthiest man in the world, nor even on our long prayers. Obviously, these are important but the Lord is saying that wealth and talents should be shared at the service of the “least, last, and lost” of society. Hence, the question that will be asked is: How much have you done or not done for them?

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The late Mother Teresa now a saint was so deeply moved by Jesus’ Parable of the Last Judgment that she left behind her work in a school and devoted her whole life among the poorest of the poor. She said, “I want to go to Heaven that’s why I follow Jesus’ teaching and devoting my life for the poor.”

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Of course, not all of us can emulate the difficult work of the late Mother Teresa of Calcutta. But we must always have the SPIRIT of charity that moves us to do works of mercy.

“When I do something good to others, especially those who cannot repay me,” someone said, “I feel immensely happy.” That’s fine. But doing good is not just a matter of nice feelings or an “extra-curricular” activity but rather a Christian obligation. This was the life led by the Lord “who went about doing good” (Acts 10,38). St. James reinforces that when he said: “Faith, without works, is dead.”

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Doing good could mean providing one’s helpers and workers security for their old age (SSS), sick leave or housing benefits. In this time of Covid-19 pandemic, the Lord expects us to reach out to the poor victims through financial help, food and medical needs, as well as prayers.

Somebody also said, “Put on a happy face. A cheery countenance can influence emotions and uplift spirits. This is true especially for those who work in hospitals, schools and government offices where you encounter a good number of glum faces going about their work like robots.”

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A man says: “What scares me most is when God says to St. Mother Teresa on Judgment Day, ‘Teresa, you should have done more good works.’

And there I am–right behind her!”

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The feast of Christ the King is a REMINDER of the Lord’s second coming and Final Judgment; likewise, it is a challenge to do more good works for the “least, the last, and the lost” of society.

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THE LIGHTER SIDE. A man confided to his friend, “I went to see my doctor about my heart ailment. He told me to change my lifestyle. No smoking, no drinking, no meat.”

“So what happened, did you change your lifestyle?” the friend said. “No…I changed my doctor,” he replied.

LESSON: Isn’t that our attitude towards God sometimes? We change Him if we don’t like his “prescription,” that is, to follow His commands and do good to the less fortunate. And if you don’t like Him, there’s the devil waiting for you.

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